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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
level that he had been waterboarded. he had practiced at the pentagon. he had been working on this. but when he referred to containment on iran rather than prevention of nuclear weapons and had to be corrected and then corrected again, a note was passed to him, and then the chairman helpfully said to him, containment is not a policy at all. that is not our policy. that is such a critical mistake on an issue that he knew that he was going to be asked about. we knew that he was going to have to explain the, quote, jewish lobby and take that back and some of the other things. the way he did it didn't seem crisp. and then when ted cruz wheeled in the tv screen to play an al jazeera talk show and put him on the spot or how he defended israel or didn't defend israel in response to a question on a talk show, it would be like somebody saying to you or mika, joe, you were on c-span ten years ago, and what did you say to someone who called in? that was very, very tough. >> that was sort of my point at the top. >> it's interesting that you had said, mika, yesterday as we were going to a meeti
was also inducted into the hall of heroes at the pentagon and honored with a parade. since then meyer has raised more than a million dollars to help send the children of wounded marines to college. and finally, as you have all seen, he is the author of "into the fire: a firsthand account of the most extraordinary battle in the afghan war." leading authorities is very proud to exclusively represent dakota meyer, and now i want to show you a video to hear more about dakota and his story. thank you. ♪ >> it's kind of frustrating because, you know, everyone wants to get an interview about the worst day of your life. >> it was a straightforward mission that then-21-year-old sergeant dakota meyer had been assigned that day. meyer waited anxiously by the vehicles as his team began their parol of the village on foot. as they approached, all hell l broke loose. more than 50 insurgents fired from positions on mountains surrounding the valley and from within the village. back at the vehicles, meyer heard the firing and could see into the valley. the volume of fire increased, and the radio traffic
talk shows and defended the man nominated to succeed him at the pentagon. panetta suggested the tough questioning senator hagel faced during third's capitol hill hearing, was driven by politics. >> it is pretty obvious the political knives were out for chuck hagel. what disappointed me is that they talked a lot about past quotes but what about when a secretary of defense is confronting today? we did not see enough time spent on discussing those issues. in the end that is what counted. >> he says hagel should have been questions about issues like afghanistan, the middle east, and the looming budget cuts at the pentagon but he came underfire for past statements of israel, iran, and u.s. nuclear strategy. at least 12 republicans plan to vote against hagel while only two, so far, have said they would vote for him. that is congress ran of mississippi, and a senator from nebraska. observers on both sides thought hagel did not do such a great job at the hearing. >> disconcerting thing, obviously fox anyone that watched it, he seemed unimpressive and unprepared on the questions that he knew w
in atlanta. and we will hear about the suspect's military background from barbara starr at the pentagon. paul, to you first. bring us up to speed on the hunts for this ex-cop, his former colleagues describing him as armed and extremely dangerous. >> reporter: that's right, michael. and in fact in his manifesto, he says i have a barrett 50, meaning a semiautomatic sniper rifle. behind me you can see officers are on high alert. not far from here in riverside, california early this morning, dorner is suspected of fatally killing one officer and critically injuring another one, as they were on patrol here in riverside. and then earlier in the morning, in corona, california, some lapd officers, who were assigned to security detail of an officer, who was mentioned in the manifesto and was off duty, these two officers were driving in corona, getting off a freeway, when they believe that dorner opened fire on them. one of those officers suffered from a grazing wound to the forehead. so in all, three separate shooting incidents involving people here. dorner apparently having an ex--military record. wh
it calls "non- lethal" assistance. and with panetta's departure from the pentagon today, plus clinton's last week and petraeus's resignation in 2012, general dempsey is the only known remaining advocate of arming the rebels still in a top advisory role. i'm joined who served in the obama administration state departments and is now dean of the school of advanced international studies at johns hopkins university. and andrew tabler, a senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy. what were the main schools of thought. how did the camps break down in this argument inside the administration on what to do about syria, andrew? >> basically you have a discussion about syria about all the different options. and it really comes down to this. the white house was hedgingment they really did not want to get involved in syria. they have a firm policy to stay out of the middle east and would like to pull back. at the same time the agencies that deal with syria and the problem there, which is growing and mushrooming, the state department, cia and to a certain extent the department o
. they don't receive combat pay and it's absolutely ridiculous. so recently, the pentagon established that a woman that serves in combat is entitled to receive all of the things that go with it to show our country's appreciation. so it seems to me that if we're going to have a draft and i really believe that if we did have a draft set up that congress would not be so anxious to the democrats and republicans to put our young people in harm's way. >> tell me why you say that because you're introduced this legislation multiple times and it's clearly something you're very committed to. you bet your life because the people in the congress that allow these things to go on, they have no fear that anyone in their community and their families are going to be making any sacrifice at all. less than 1% of americans, most of whom volunteer for economic reasons paid the price in terms of 6600 lives lost, tens of thousands of people wounded. veterans, american veterans coming home, disoriented, unemploy unemployed, some homeless and no one pays a price. i submit to you, we would not be in iraq, afgh
in the state department or the pentagon are there. i think at some point the united states government and the white house have to make a decision that syria is an actual danger to america's national security interests. it is not something we can wash our hands from. and there are serious dangers and implications to the united states and the president actually to ask its national security team for realistic options that then he request gather his team and debate and decide about. there hasn't, i think, been a serious debate even with thunited stasgovernment as to what might be our three top options what are the costs and benefits of each. and if we were to pursue one of them, how would we do it. >> is there a legitimate argument that this destabilizes turkey to some degree, an important country to the united states, and a nato ally, andrew. >> absolutely. thousands of syrians go over the border into turkey every day. and it's very easy for pkk fighters, kurdish fighters to meld into those refugees, to go across the border and carry out terrorists attacks insidef tuey. no government in
to charlie's child and to her wife. >> right. >> those benefits, the pentagon no matter how much they want to, they can't do those things. >> right. >> because they are precluded by law because of doma. >> and secretary panetta and the president, they did all they could under the law. and that's what a lot of people don't understand. here is another story charlie told me. she said when she was doing her live interview, she also went to see her then congressman from new hampshire. and she told her story. and the congressman said oh, but you're okay. you live in new hampshire. you're legally married in new hampshire. that's legal. so you're taken care of. so her congressman didn't even know that her wife was treated as a second class citizen and didn't enjoy the benefits that other military families enjoyed. so if the congressman didn't know, you know, the american public has no idea. so we need to continue telling charlie's story. >> the reason that i wanted to play that particular clip of her lobbying gene shaheen there, gene shaheen obviously somebody who has been very supportive of her. but
knife in the drawer at the pentagon. that's the job description. he's not going to the department of the interior. in terms of whether or not republicans will vote to confirm him, democrats need to hold together and get five republicans to confirm him and he should be able to become the next secretary of defense. there are grumblings among republican senators that they may consider putting a hold on his information to extracts more answers from the administration on the issue of benghazi. that this could be leverage to get to the bottom of that debacle and understanding better the administration's timeline, position, since they didn't get straight answers from former secretary of state hillary clinton. >> yeah. >> i think if they do that, it would be a big political mistake. the perception would be very negative for the republicans. >> any single senator can put a hold a nomination. it's been done before. in terms of voting down the nomination, that hasn't happened to a senator since john tower. i don't see that happening. >> let's talk immigration and gun control. both were big t
good-bye for leon panetta. the pentagon sends the boss off with a formal ceremony happening today, even though he is likely to be on the job for at least another couple of weeks. panetta spoke yesterday before congress, said there will always an debate over how much military power to put around the world. >> united states military, as i've said, is not and frankly should not be a 911 service capable of arriving on the scene within minutes to every possible contingency around the world. u.s. military has neither the resources nor the responsibility to have a firehouse next to every u.s. facility in the world. >> former senator chuck hagel has been nominated to replace panetta. that confirmation vote continues and has been postponed. >>> a look at this massive crowd that filled the streets in tunisia. this was a public funeral of an opposition leader shot dead outside his home wednesday. thousands of grieving and angry folks marching with his coffin to a cemetery. many believe it was a political assassination. riot police have violently put down several public demonstrations since that sh
discuss their experiences and challenges and comment on the pentagon's recently lifting of its ban on women in combat. they're joined by women who are served in the canadian and norwegian military. this event held here in washington d.c. it's about an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> thank you very much. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning. >> talking about new standards. so, anyway -- >> so all i can say is, wow. wow. i mean, it's really an honor to be here and to hear the testimonies of those amazing women who not only are deck candidated -- decorated combat veterans but are ridiculously articulate and to hear what their experiences were and what they had to share this morning. i'm truly honored to be here with this panel. all of these women are truly accomplished and have lifted the groundwork on lift -- they've been part of women forging areas into new paths of previously hi reticket -- previously-restricted service, and they have expertise on gender integration in the military. so their full bios are available in your program, but i'll give them each a brief introducti
. the pentagon now cutting the amount of persian gulf aircraft carriers from two to one and delaying the fueling to save money. >> and others are ramping up spending and senior fellow at the advanced studies, lt. colonel tony schaeffer joins us now. >> how are you. >> alisyn: doing well. three weeks from now, march 1st, if congress doesn't get its act together there are sweeping military cuts set to go in place and this, at the same time that we know that china and russia, in the face of two decades will outpace us with their military spending. what do you make of that? >> well, firstoff, we spend 40% of the world's budget on defense right now and i think what we have to do is fix our strategy first. one of the problems is, ali, we have had the same basic frame work since 1947 and 1947 with some adjustments in the 80's, we figure out the real threats. i always talk about the beginning with the end in mind and this is where we have an opportunity here, since we won the cold war, we're ending the wars in afghanistan and iraq, time to rethink how we focus what we do. we've noticed spending money on
, there is concern of layoffs. the dimensions darpa -- you d darpa. the except the restraints on the pentagon plus those coming into play, that have negative impacts? >> we are not a big player in that space anymore. i think a little bit of catalyst is something you see in every corner of the world. whether it is europe or china or anyplace else, i did not go to one place where there is no one government at all. the private sector is still very strong here and innovative. the private sector can pick up a lot. just getting it done. the will be such a value in a just getting some of these things behind us so we can adjust to move forward. the sigh of relief is incredibly important right now. i am an optimist. it does not end with a discussion on washington. we can compete. the work force of the to this country is as good as any in the world. >> thank you for the optimistic note. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] moste church is boston's visited historic site. half a million come to the church every year because
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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